Tackling the growing problem of violence and abuse against older people

27 November

Birmingham
PRICE

Speakers

Dr Hannah Bows
Assistant Professor in Criminal Law

Start

November 27, 2019 - 9:30 am

End

November 27, 2019 - 3:45 pm

Address

Aston University, The Aston Triangle, Birmingham, B4 7ET   View map



Background

 

Traditionally, older people have been considered low risk for violence and abuse, based upon crime statistics. As a consequence, research and policy has largely developed without this group in mind.

However, recent findings suggest that abuse against older people is more common than was previously thought. One in six older people living in the community will experience physical, emotional, sexual or financial abuse each year. To put it in context, this equates to two million people a year, approximately equivalent to the total estimated number currently affected by domestic abuse in the UK.

Sexual abuse of older people is particularly under-researched. The Crime Statistics for England and Wales cap the age limit at which rape is recorded at 59, so in this survey rape and similar crimes against older people are not recorded. It is also likely that sexual crimes are under-reported by older people.

Relatively little is known about the dynamics of abuse, especially sexual abuse, against older people. One recent development, for example, is the increased use by older people of online dating sites, and social media like Facebook, which have raised issues around grooming of older people.

Most elder abuse is perpetrated by family members, either spouses or children, bringing the abuse within the definition and framework of domestic violence.

Stereotypes based on age mean that older victims may be overlooked by police forces, health professionals and other key agencies. Equally, a one-size-fits-all model of “elder abuse” risks creating misconceptions by assuming that the problem is only associated with the age of the victim. Evidence suggests that violence against older people isn’t necessarily a problem caused by age. For example, there may be ongoing, but hitherto undisclosed, domestic abuse between a husband and wife.

How do we unpick these findings, and introduce new ways of working in response? There need, in particular, to be improvements to risk assessment in order to spot more signs of potentially abusive relationships.

 This learning day will look at:

  • the nature and different types of violence and abuse against older people
  • the gaps in current policy and practice
  • what steps can be taken to strengthen practice approaches, particularly relating to assessment, to address the problem
  • Case studies and examples from the UK and the USA

 

Recent findings suggest that abuse against older people is more common than was previously thought. One in six older people living in the community will experience physical, emotional, sexual or financial abuse each year. Stereotypes based on age mean that older victims may be overlooked by police forces, health professionals and other key agencies.

 This learning day will look at:

  • the nature and different types of violence and abuse against older people
  • the gaps in current policy and practice
  • what steps can be taken to strengthen practice approaches, particularly relating to assessment, to address the problem
  • Case studies and examples from the UK and the USA

 

The day will be facilitated by Dr Hannah Bows, Assistant Professor in Criminal Law and Director of Equality and Diversity within Durham Law School. She is Co-Director of the Centre for Criminal Law and Criminal Justice and Deputy Director of the Centre for Research into Violence and Abuse (CRiVA).  Hannah is a 2019 Fellow of the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust, visiting the United States to research the theme of Improving Criminal Justice Responses to Elder Abuse. She is also Chair of Age UK Teesside.


Agenda (subject to change)

9.30 – 10.00

Registration and coffee

10.00 – 10.10

Welcome and introduction to the day

10.10 – 11.20

A continuum?  What do we know about violence and abuse against older people?

11.20 – 11.45

Coffee break

11.45 – 12.45

What’s in a name?  Thinking critically about how we understand violence and abuse against older people

12.45 – 1.35

Lunch

1.35 – 2.35

Risk assessment and management: multi-agency responses to violence and abuse against older people

2.35 – 2.55

Quick break – collect tea and snacks

2.55 – 3.45

What can we learn from international approaches?

3.45

Final questions and close of day

  • Adults’ social workers
  • Ageing Better and Age Friendly professionals
  • Other professionals with responsibility for safeguarding adults
  • NHS professionals working with older people
  • Police
  • Community safety professionals
  • Domestic and sexual abuse organisations
  • Advice and advocacy organisations
  • Organisations focussing on older people’s issues
  • Care homes
  • Organisations working with carers
  • Social housing providers

Delegate fee:

 £130 + VAT = £156

*Team of 3 (3rd person attends for half price) £325 + VAT = £390

*Team of 5 (5th person attends for free) £520 + VAT = £624

ring 0115 916 3104 for details.

 

Included in the delegate package:

  • Delegate pack
  • Lunch
  • Refreshments available throughout the day

 

Booking Terms and Conditions

Cancellations received up to and including 6 November 2019 will be refunded in full less an administration fee of 25%. Cancellations received after this date will be liable for payment in full.

*Team bookings are non-cancellable but substitute delegates will always be accepted.

The full invoice amount will remain payable if you fail to attend the event, however, substitute delegates will be accepted up until, and including, the day of the event.

CANCELLATIONS SHOULD BE MADE IN WRITING TO conferences@ccclimited.org.uk AND WILL BE ACKNOWLEDGED BY RETURN.

 

Confirmation of booking:

Your booking will be confirmed by email where possible (and by fax or post otherwise), and you will be provided with directions to the venue and details on nearby hotel accommodation. If you do not receive such acknowledgement, please contact Central Conference Consultants Ltd on 0115 916 3104.

Dr Hannah Bows

Hannah is an Assistant Professor in Criminal Law and Director of Equality and Diversity within Durham Law School. She is Co-Director of the Centre for Criminal Law and Criminal Justice and Deputy Director of the Centre for Research into Violence and Abuse (CRiVA).

Over the last six years she has conducted research examining different forms of violence against older people, with a specific focus on domestic violence, sexual violence and homicide of older women. This work has led to a range of outputs, media interviews and articles, policy and public engagement activity. She was awarded an ESRC Outstanding Impact (runner-up) prize in 2017.

Hannah is a 2019 Fellow of the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust, visiting the United States to research the theme of Improving Criminal Justice Responses to Elder Abuse.

Hannah is the founder and director of the International Network for Research into Violence and Abuse and co-director of the British Society of Criminology Victims Network (with Professor Pam Davies at Northumbria University). She is Chair of Age UK Teesside.

The training will take place in Birmingham City Centre:

Conference Aston Meeting Suites

Aston University,

The Aston Triangle,

Birmingham,

B4 7ET

Venue telephone – 0121 204 4300

New Street, Snow Hill and Moor Street train stations are all within 20 minutes walk of the venue or a 5 minute taxi journey.

Car parking and direction information

Follow this link for a downloadable map, directions and car park information:  http://www.conferenceaston.co.uk/attending-an-event/how-do-i-get-to-you/

There are pay and display car parks on-site but spaces must be booked in advance – follow the link above to do this.

 Accommodation:

 There is a hotel on-site in the Aston Business School

Follow this link for costs, details of rooms and booking information:

http://www.conferenceaston.co.uk/book-hotel-room/