Social media, street gangs and youth violence - THIS EVENT IS NOW FULLLY BOOKED

17 January

Aston Conference Centre, Birmingham
PRICE

Speakers

Junior Smart
Business Development Manager and Head of SOS Gangs Project, St Giles Trust

Start

January 17, 2019 - 9:30 am

End

January 17, 2019 - 3:45 pm

Address

Aston University, The Aston Triangle, Birmingham, B4 7ET   View map
StGT logo PNG (2)




Gang activity on social media (You Tube, Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter in particular) is being cited as one of the causes of a rise in youth violence, particularly in London. This echoes the experience of Chicago and, if no action is taken, other areas of the UK are likely to see a rise in youth violence fuelled by social media.

While youth violence has root causes in poverty and social exclusion, social media has afforded street gangs a potent range of new tools to reach a wider audience, create competing ‘brand’ images, and generate a febrile environment of violence.

Services are often left behind as gangs move online, using technical expertise and street language which are not understood by mainstream professionals. Precisely because social media is public, perceived insults cannot be ignored. Gang members may film themselves walking through another gang’s territory, and post it on Snapchat, You Tube or Facebook, thereby provoking retaliation.  Insults and threats can also be extremely personal. One case which ended up in court involved gang retribution against rivals who had posted images of a gang member’s grandmother being abused and harassed. In the USA this is known as ‘internet or cyber banging’.

Several gangs include young men who are skilled musicians and who create the now notorious ‘drill rap’ music, often performed with masked and armed gang members making gang signs to taunt rivals, gain profile and recruit followers.

The Metropolitan Police has set up Operation Domain which collects gang related material from social media and works with Google to have it taken down. Despite this, mainstream services are lagging behind the gangs in their ability to use social media, to understand the language of gangs, and to contain the fallout from online activities.

This learning day is a rare opportunity to reach into the online world of street gangs, and to unpick how they communicate, and how online communication turns to real-life violence. Facilitated by the St Giles Trust’s Junior Smart, Founder and Head of the SOS Gangs Project, participants will have the opportunity to track gang activity online, using their own phones or tablets.

Junior will also consider the cultural impact of drill music on young people, and look at options for staying ahead of street violence and preventing harm through social media, and other measures which can help to address social media-inspired violence.

 

This learning day is a rare opportunity to reach into the online world of street gangs, and to unpick how they communicate, and how online communication turns to real-life violence.

Facilitated by the St Giles Trust’s Junior Smart, Founder and Head of the SOS Gangs Project, participants will have the opportunity to track gang activity online, using their own phones or tablets.

Junior will also consider the cultural impact of drill music on young people, and look at options for staying ahead of street violence and preventing harm through social media, and other measures which can help to address social media-inspired violence.

Participants are urged to bring smart phones or tablets so that they can follow Junior’s tracking of street gangs.

In particular, the sessions will examine:

  • How social media has become important to street gangs over the last few years
  • Online sex and its impact on young people and their perception of consent
  • Drugs and weapon availability online
  • Look at examples of social media tools used by street gangs
  • Track gang activity online including interpreting language, symbols and emojis, and videos
  • Understanding their slang terms
  • Different types of attack and what it means
  • Analyse specific triggers for subsequent violence
  • Consider the wider cultural impact of drill music, and whether it has had an impact on youth violence
  • Look at options for tackling the use of social media by street gangs

Agenda (subject to change)

9.30 – 10.00

Registration and coffee

10.00 – 10.15

Welcome, introductions and aims of the day

10.15 – 11.00

Today’s street gangs

  • brief overview of gangs
  • different types of gangs
  • how they have changed for both males and females

11.00 – 11.40

The impact of on-line pressure on young people’s actions

  • online sex and drugs
  • weapons available online
  • how availability and ease of access changes the dynamic of young people’s actions

11.40 – 12.00

Coffee

12.00 – 12.55

Getting into the on-line world of street gangs

  • music videos and gangs
  • different genres of music
  • how to track gangs online
  • the new true value system

12.55 – 13.50

Lunch

13.50 -14.50

Gangs, violence and different forms of attack

  • analysing the evidence
  • implications for county lines
  • implications for prison

14.50 – 15.00

Quick tea break

15.00 – 15.45

Understanding the language of street gangs

  • Looking at slang terms
  • Things the practitioner needs to know
  • Who do you report it to?
  • How do you support young people involved?
  • Considering the next steps

15.45

Close of session

  • Children’s social workers
  • Schools
  • Services for children excluded from school
  • Pupil referral units
  • Missing children services
  • Specialist gangs services
  • Specialist Child Sexual Exploitation services
  • Looked after children’s services
  • Child sexual exploitation services
  • Children’s charities
  • Youth workers
  • Youth offending services
  • Police
  • Prisons and probation services
  • Social housing
  • Services working with vulnerable adults
  • Community health services

This event is now fully booked

Delegate fee:

 £130 + VAT = £156

*Team of 3 (3rd person attends for half price) £325 + VAT = £390

*Team of 5 (5th person attends for free) £520 + VAT = £624

ring 0115 916 3104 for details.

 

Included in the delegate package:

  • Delegate pack
  • Lunch
  • Refreshments available throughout the day

 

Booking Terms and Conditions

Cancellations received up to and including 27 December 2018 will be refunded in full less an administration fee of 25%. Cancellations received after this date will be liable for payment in full.

Team bookings are non-cancellable but substitute delegates will always be accepted.

The full invoice amount will remain payable if you fail to attend the event, however, substitute delegates will be accepted up until, and including, the day of the event.

CANCELLATIONS SHOULD BE MADE IN WRITING TO conferences@ccclimited.org.uk AND WILL BE ACKNOWLEDGED BY RETURN.

 

Confirmation of booking:

Your booking will be confirmed by email where possible (and by fax or post otherwise), and you will be provided with directions to the venue and details on nearby hotel accommodation. If you do not receive such acknowledgement, please contact Central Conference Consultants Ltd on 0115 916 3104.

The training will take place in Birmingham City Centre:

Conference Aston Meeting Suites

Aston University,

The Aston Triangle,

Birmingham,

B4 7ET

Venue telephone – 0121 204 4300

New Street, Snow Hill and Moor Street train stations are all within 20 minutes walk of the venue or a 5 minute taxi journey.

Car parking and direction information

Follow this link for a downloadable map, directions and car park information:  http://www.conferenceaston.co.uk/attending-an-event/how-do-i-get-to-you/

There are pay and display car parks on-site but spaces must be booked in advance – follow the link above to do this.

 Accommodation:

 There is a hotel on-site in the Aston Business School

Follow this link for costs, details of rooms and booking information:

http://www.conferenceaston.co.uk/book-hotel-room/