Adopting Trauma Informed Services to address the effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)

18 September 2018

Nottingham Conference Centre
PRICE

Speakers

Dr Sheena Webb
Consultant Clinical Psychologist

Start

September 18, 2018 - 9:30 am

End

September 18, 2018 - 3:45 pm

Address

Nottingham Conference Centre, Burton Street, Nottingham, NG1 4BU   View map



Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) are traumatic events or experiences which impact children while growing up, notably:

  • sexual abuse
  • emotional abuse by parent
  • physical abuse by parent
  • emotional neglect by parent
  • physical neglect by parent
  • loss of, or abandonment by, a parent
  • witnessing abuse in the household
  • drug/alcohol misuse in the household
  • mental illness in the household
  • close family member imprisoned

These ACEs have the potential to damage both mental and physical health across the life course. The more ACEs a child lives through, the higher the likelihood of health and social problems in later life.

Chemical changes can occur following ACEs, which leave children in a long term heightened state of stress, making it difficult for them to think rationally or absorb information in school. There is now supporting evidence which confirms that ACEs can also impact physical health in a fundamental way, by impeding the development of organs and the immune system, resulting in a higher predisposition to certain diseases and conditions.

Negative outcomes rise significantly with the number of ACEs experienced. Blackburn with Darwen, which has mainstreamed ACE-informed services, undertook a study in 2012 which showed that an individual who had experienced 4 or more ACEs was  30 times more likely to have had a sexually transmitted infection (STI), 10 times more likely to be addicted to crack or heroin and 9 times more likely to spend time in prison.

Across UK studies, approximately 55% of adults have had no ACEs, while 10% have had four or more.

Complex trauma arising from ACEs poses a challenge to many service providers, where repeated contact with service users yields little or no satisfactory outcome. Adopting a Trauma Informed approach can significantly assist in making services a more ‘comfortable fit’ for service users, and can consequently improve engagement, length and quality of contact, and outcomes. It is not a treatment model, rather a shift in culture which makes it more likely that a service can create a good outcome for the service user.

What does it mean for services to become ‘ACE aware’? And how does this fit with making services Trauma Informed? What new skills do professionals need? What organisational change is needed? What positive outcomes for service users have been identified?

Dr Sheena Webb is the London Family Drug and Alcohol Court (FDAC) team manager and a consultant clinical child psychologist. Sheena and her team work closely with parents who are, or have been, alcohol and drug dependent and who often have experienced the successive removal of children into care. She will explore these key questions around ACEs and Trauma Informed Services with particular reference to the practice of London FDAC, but also with reference to other research and good practice in the UK.

Complex trauma arising from ACEs poses a challenge to many service providers, where repeated contact with service users yields little or no satisfactory outcome.

Adopting a Trauma Informed approach can significantly assist in making services a more ‘comfortable fit’ for service users who have ACEs, and can consequently improve engagement, length and quality of contact, and outcomes.

What does it mean for services to become ‘ACE aware’? And how does this fit with making services Trauma Informed? What new skills do professionals need? What organisational change is needed? What positive outcomes for service users have been identified?

Dr Sheena Webb is the London Family Drug and Alcohol Court (FDAC) team manager and a consultant clinical child psychologist. Sheena and her team work closely with parents who are, or have been, alcohol and drug dependent and who often have experienced the successive removal of children into care. She will explore these key questions around ACEs and Trauma Informed Services with particular reference to the practice of London FDAC, but also with reference to other research and good practice in the UK.


Agenda (subject to change)

9.30 – 10.00

Registration and coffee

10.00 – 10.10

Welcome and introduction

10.10 – 11.15

ACEs – What are they? What has the research shown to date?

11.15 – 11.40

Coffee break

11.40 – 12.45

A brief history of trauma and its consequences

12.45 – 1.35

Lunch

1.35 – 2.35

Implications of the ACE study for practice and service provision

2.35 – 2.45

Quick break

2.45 – 3.45

Building Trauma Informed Services

3.45

Close

  • Parent and family support workers
  • Children’s social workers
  • Specialist family support professionals in schools
  • Children’s charities including those that work with young carers
  • Troubled families’ services
  • Successive removals specialist services
  • Adult services professionals
  • Drug and alcohol specialists
  • Services which work with victims of domestic and sexual abuse
  • Midwives, health visitors, and other community health professionals
  • Mental health services
  • Probation staff
  • Other women’s services working with vulnerable women including female offenders
  • Services working with sex workers and modern slavery
  • Support services within social housing

Delegate fee:

 £130 + VAT = £156

*Team of 3 (3rd person attends for half price) £325 + VAT = £390

*Team of 5 (5th person attends for free) £520 + VAT = £624

ring 0115 916 3104 for details.

 

Included in the delegate package:

  • Delegate pack
  • Lunch
  • Refreshments available throughout the day

 

Booking Terms and Conditions

Cancellations received up to and including 28 August 2018 will be refunded in full less an administration fee of 25%. Cancellations received after this date will be liable for payment in full.

*Team bookings are non-cancellable but substitute delegates will always be accepted.

The full invoice amount will remain payable if you fail to attend the event, however, substitute delegates will be accepted up until, and including, the day of the event.

CANCELLATIONS SHOULD BE MADE IN WRITING TO conferences@ccclimited.org.uk AND WILL BE ACKNOWLEDGED BY RETURN.

 

Confirmation of booking:

Your booking will be confirmed by email where possible (and by fax or post otherwise), and you will be provided with directions to the venue and details on nearby hotel accommodation. If you do not receive such acknowledgement, please contact Central Conference Consultants Ltd on 0115 916 3104.

The learning day will take place at Nottingham Conference Centre in the heart of Nottingham city.

The full address is:

Nottingham Conference Centre
Burton Street
Nottingham
NG1 4BU

Link to Nottingham Conference Centre website directions and map – http://www.nottinghamconferencecentre.co.uk/location

Car parking – the nearest car park is Q Park on Stanley Street, just off Talbot Street. Delegates can obtain a discounted rate by paying for the parking at Nottingham Conference Centre.

http://www.q-park.co.uk/parking/nottingham/q-park-talbot-street

Rail – the venue is a 10 – 15 minute walk from Nottingham rail station.

However, the tram (which runs from the rail station) takes 5 minutes and stops outside the Nottingham Conference Centre (it’s the Royal Centre stop). The trams run continually and frequently, but you can check out more detail by clicking here – http://www.thetram.net/maps-times.aspx

Accommodation

There is a Premier Inn two minutes from the Nottingham Conference Centre;

The Premier Inn

Nottingham City Centre

Goldsmith Street

NG1 5LT

T: 0871 527 8846

http://www.premierinn.com

The hotel car park is a short distance away and carries a small charge.

In addition, the venue has produced a list of other hotels with which it has special deals

http://www.nottinghamconferencecentre.co.uk/location/hotels-accommodation