Adopting Trauma Informed Services to address the effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) - This LEARNING DAY IS DELIVERED ON-LINE (10/11/12 February 2021)

10/11/12 February 2021

on-line
PRICE

Speakers

Dr Sheena Webb
Consultant Clinical Psychologist

Start

February 10, 2021

End

February 12, 2021




Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) are traumatic events or experiences which impact children while growing up, in particular:

  • sexual abuse
  • emotional abuse by parent
  • physical abuse by parent
  • emotional neglect by parent
  • physical neglect by parent
  • loss of, or abandonment by, a parent
  • witnessing abuse in the household
  • drug/alcohol misuse in the household
  • mental illness in the household
  • close family member imprisoned

These ACEs have the potential to damage both mental and physical health across the life course. The more ACEs a child lives through, the higher the likelihood of health and social problems in later life.

Chemical changes can occur following ACEs, which leave children in a long term heightened state of stress, making it difficult for them to think rationally or absorb information in school. There is now supporting evidence which confirms that ACEs can also impact physical health in a fundamental way, by impeding the development of organs and the immune system, resulting in a higher predisposition to certain diseases and conditions.

Negative outcomes rise significantly with the number of ACEs experienced. Blackburn with Darwen, for example, which has mainstreamed ACE-informed services, undertook a study in 2012 which showed that an individual who had experienced 4 or more ACEs was  30 times more likely to have had a sexually transmitted infection (STI), 10 times more likely to be addicted to crack or heroin and 9 times more likely to spend time in prison.

Across UK studies, approximately 55% of adults have had no ACEs, while 10% have had four or more.

Complex trauma arising from ACEs poses a challenge to many service providers, where repeated contact with service users yields little or no satisfactory outcome. Adopting a Trauma Informed approach can significantly assist in making services a more ‘comfortable fit’ for service users, and can consequently improve engagement, length and quality of contact, and outcomes. It is not a treatment model, rather a shift in culture which makes it more likely that a service can create a good outcome for the service user.

There is an increased awareness of ACEs across a range of sectors, which has helped to encourage the growth of trauma informed practice across a range of sectors. However, there have also been some criticisms of the way in which the ACEs approach has been implemented.

This on-line learning day will address the key questions around ACEs and Trauma Informed services:

  • What does it mean for services to become ‘ACE aware’?
  • How does this fit with making services Trauma Informed?
  • Do professionals need new skills?
  • Is organisational change needed?
  • What positive outcomes for service users have been identified?
  • How valid are recent criticisms of the ACEs approach?

Delegates will be offered the opportunity to participate in a one-hour Q&A session on 12 February.

Complex trauma arising from Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) poses a challenge to many service providers, where repeated contact with service users yields little or no satisfactory outcome.

A Trauma Informed approach can significantly assist in making services a more ‘comfortable fit’ for service users, and can consequently improve engagement, length and quality of contact, and outcomes. It is not a treatment model, rather a shift in culture which makes it more likely that a service can create a good outcome for the service user.

There is an increased awareness of ACEs across a range of sectors, which has helped to encourage the growth of trauma informed practice across a range of sectors. However, there have also been some recent criticisms of the way in which the ACEs approach has been implemented.

This on-line learning day will address the key questions around ACEs and Trauma Informed services:

  • What does it mean for services to become ‘ACE aware’?
  • How does this fit with making services Trauma Informed?
  • Do professionals need new skills?
  • Is organisational change needed?
  • What positive outcomes for service users have been identified?
  • How valid are recent criticisms of the ACEs approach? 

Agenda (subject to change)

Accessing the training and delegate information –

The on-line training sessions will be available for the period of three days in  February (10/11/12 February).

Delegates will be sent an individual link to access the sessions for a three day period.   This will be sent a week prior to the beginning of this three day period.

Materials which support the sessions will be e-mailed to delegates two weeks before their access period begins.

Session 1

Trauma, Complex Trauma and service delivery

  • Our evolving understanding of trauma and adversity
  • How complex trauma manifests in our services
  • Psychological processes that impact on engagement

Session 2

Principles of Trauma Informed Care

  • The rationale for Trauma Informed Care
  • Core principles of Trauma Informed Care
  • Critical evaluation of ACEs and Trauma Informed Care

Session 3

Trauma Informed Care at the organisational level

  • Implementing Trauma Informed Care
  • Examples of implementation
  • Barriers, pitfalls and considerations

Session 4

Trauma Informed Care at the practitioner level

  • The importance of communication in creating safety
  • Practitioner biases, assumptions and reactions
  • Secondary trauma, trauma-informed supervision and practitioner support

Q&A SESSION (approximately one hour)

Q&A session, up to one hour long:

– Friday 12 February

A link will be sent to access the Q&A.  You can submit a question via e-mail prior to this date, which will be sent through to the presenter.   There will also be direct questions to the presenter on the day, the number subject to availability of time.

  • Parent and family support workers
  • Children’s social workers
  • Specialist family support professionals in schools
  • Children’s charities including those that work with young carers
  • Troubled families’ services
  • Successive removals specialist services
  • Adult services professionals
  • Drug and alcohol specialists
  • Services which work with victims of domestic and sexual abuse
  • Midwives, health visitors, and other community health professionals
  • Mental health services
  • Probation staff
  • Other women’s services working with vulnerable women including female offenders
  • Services working with sex workers and modern slavery
  • Support services within social housing

Delegate fee:

 £99 + VAT = £118.80

*Team of 3 £275 + VAT = £330

*Team of 5 £425 + VAT = £510

For any queries, including requesting a fee for a larger group, please telephone  0115 9163104

Booking Terms and Conditions

  • Delegates will not be able to cancel their places after materials have been e-mailed out (two weeks before they are able to access the sessions)
  • Places must be paid for prior to materials being e-mailed to the delegate
  • Delegates may cancel their booking prior to materials being e-mailed out, less an administration fee of 25%
  • Substitutions will be accepted but these must be notified in writing
  • Due to the significant discounts offered, team bookings are non-cancellable
  •  Cancellations should be made in writing to CCClimited@aol.com and will be acknowledged by return

Confirmation of booking:

Your booking will be confirmed (and invoiced) by e-mail.  You will be e-mailed a link to access your learning sessions, together with outline information on the training.

The on-line training sessions will be available for a period of three days in  February (10/11/12 February).

If you do not receive such acknowledgement, please contact Central Conference Consultants Ltd on 0115 916 3104.